10 most inaccurate school reform axioms

Below Dov Rosenberg lists what he considers the 10 most inaccurate and damaging statements that some school reformers toss around. Rosenberg, who loves to help teachers use technology, has been serving North Carolina public school students and teachers for 11 years as a teacher and instructional technology facilitator.

Here’s Rosenberg’s list:

1. High-stakes standardized test data produce the fairest, most reliable,
(bigstock) and least expensive evidence of student comprehension as well as teacher ability.

2. High-stakes standardized tests are updated routinely to eliminate confusing and/or culturally biased aspects, and questions on these tests are comprehensible by any child who can read on grade level.

3. Testing anxiety is rare, affects mostly low-achieving students, and has a minimal impact on test results.

4. High-stakes tests do not take an unreasonable amount of time for students to complete and test preparation does not take an unreasonable amount of instructional time throughout the year.

Read more

One response to “10 most inaccurate school reform axioms

  1. BRAVO! I have just learned about this. As a retired teacher and administrator I am thrilled. I have NEVER been in support of increased testing. As a teacher my curriculum was portfolio based. It is much more authentic representation of student ability. It also allows for improvement day to day. Life is day to day experience that does not exist in a box. We need to expand the minds of our children, not restrict them to a tiny circle. As an administrator I was ALWAYS in personal conflict with the workbooks that teach kids how to pass these assessments.
    Since NCLB became the law of the land the drop out rate has increased significantly, leading to many other issues. GED programs have skyrocketed. It is time to put education back into the hands of the people who are trained to judge what does and does not work for kids.
    This generation will be supporting us in our old age. We need to give them all the skills possible.

Comments are closed.